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brontesommerfeld:

Day 5: put cellophane on my windows last night, woke up this morning inside a rainbow
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marklovejoydotcom:

#5344
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199599
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corn-silk:

Edward Scissorhands, 1991.
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areyoutryingtodeduceme:

jungwildeandfree:

eatcleanmakechanges:

there’s nothing like tea.

holy shit the tea fandom doesn’t fuck around

you think this is a fucking game?
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melissacronk:

The opal is said to be many things including the most powerful of healing stones, the stone of hope, the stone of great achievement and even the “stone of the Gods”. It is said to be the stone of love, but only to faithful lovers. The opal will bring misfortune to an unfaithful lover.
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goths:

Jennifer Mehigan
20770
"Of course, not all women of color are sexualized in the same way. For example, while black women are considered lascivious, always consenting and out of control, Latina women are considered exotic or overly sensual and Asian women are considered childish and prude. These particular stereotypes are reinforced through popular culture and pornography (just Google respectively “Asian women,” “black women,” or “Latina women” and then “women” and see what comes up). The common thread here is that nonwhite women’s sexuality is seen as outside the norm of white heterosexuality. It’s therefore something to be uniquely desired, manipulated, exploited, or controlled. Within this rather toxic climate, being a woman of color who’s in touch with her sexuality is an act of resistance. Pushing past the negative media depictions and still finding a healthy, healing, erotic, and functional sexuality is no small feat."
? Samhita Mukhopadhyay
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